Friday, 6 March 2009

The Bible

There's no better book than the Bible. You can learn about God's unconditional love and the movement of the Holy Spirit in the lives of people like ourselves. It is a sacred text inspired by God, reliable from cover to cover.

Psalm 119:91 (MSG)
91 Your Word and truth are dependable as ever; that's what you ordered—you set the earth going.

10 comments:

Heart to God, Hand to Man said...

And it covers so many genres - bibliography, non fiction, self help, mystery, thriller, drama, theory, life skills, even 'choose your own adventure' (although I don't necessarily chose it!). The list can go on and on. Although it is the same each time I read it, I am most blessed when the Holy Spirit challenges me to understand a passage in a different way.

Lauren said...

What would we think of the following story if it was happening in our neighbourhood?

A large group of children have a father who would sacrfice anything for them to know that he loves them. This father does not demand anything of his children but only asks that they would come to know of his unconditional love for them.
Despite this, these children continue to treat their father with indifference and contempt.

God is a God of love... and one should look at the Bible as a whole (new testament included)to see that.

Jim Knaggs said...

Jack - If you're familiar with the blog, you're not surprised that I deleted your comment. I'd be pleased to carry on the conversation if you'd like:

james.knaggs@aus.salvationarmy.org

I hope to hear from you.

Jack said...

Fair enough Jim. I just wonder why Christians pick and choose from the bible (usually concentrating on the 'God is love' parts) rather than look at everything that it says. Do you wish the difficult bits just weren't in there?

Jim Knaggs said...

The Bible tends to tell only the parts we need to know. While it contains history, theology and counsel, it is neither a history book, theological textbbok or counseling manual. I would more like to know the missing bits, than delete the tough bits. Life is tough. The bible is more relevant to me because of the questions. I do start on the premise of faith and confidence in the Word. Then we need to take it all in context. Sometimes we err by pulling out bits that serve our purposes.

Great question. Thanks.

Cameron Horsburgh said...

I would recommend the book 'The Blue Parakeet' by Scot McKnight.

It looks at how we read the Bible and how we tend to choose some bits and ignore others. It also discusses how the way we read the Bible will be affected by our context and how we should approach it in the 21st Century.

David said...

Yep, there's something for everyone in the Bible.

"Women's Weekly" style gossip:

When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments. Alexander the metalworker did me a great deal of harm. The Lord will repay him for what he has done. (2 Timothy 4:13-13)

Scientific guidelines (CSIRO need to look at this):

Jacob, however, took fresh-cut branches from poplar, almond and plane trees and made white stripes on them by peeling the bark and exposing the white inner wood of the branches. Then he placed the peeled branches in all the watering troughs, so that they would be directly in front of the flocks when they came to drink. When the flocks were in heat and came to drink, they mated in front of the branches. And they bore young that were streaked or speckled or spotted. (Genesis 30:37-39)

Family values such as how to sell your daughter:

And if a man sell his daughter to be a maidservant, she shall not go out as the menservants do. (Exodus 21:7)

Jim Knaggs said...

Anon. Now let's not pick on others, even celebraties.

David - glad to see you're reading the Bible. Now try the gospel of John and do so with a mind and soul open to God.

John Duthie said...

I can understand David's point of view, in some Christian churches some sections of the bible get much coverage, and others don't. I feel that there is much focus on the loving aspects and behaviour of Jesus, and not much in terms of the angry side of Jesus. e.g. the over turning of the money changers tables. I know that Jesus was seldom angry, however the 'bad' emotions seem to be glossed over, and we are told not to be angry. Thats my experience anyway.

p.s. I've never heard a sermon about Song of Songs Chapter 1 verse 1 :-)

Ex-Salvo said...

Lauren told a nice hypothetical story, but left out some important bits. Her story reads:

A large group of children have a father who would sacrfice anything for them to know that he loves them. This father does not demand anything of his children but only asks that they would come to know of his unconditional love for them. Despite this, these children continue to treat their father with indifference and contempt.

The most important part of the story is missing - how does the father respond to being rejected by his children? Some fathers would react violently. Others would simply be saddened and allow the rebellious children to live their lives without dispensing any punishment. The God of the Abrahamic religions is an example of the former - he gets angry and punishes, forever, his wayward children.

That simply does not comport at all with Lauren's final assertion that God is a god of love.